Site icon Healthacea

Does your blood group make you less vulnerable to Coronavirus?

Coronavirus and blood type

?????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????

Do You Know Your Blood Type? As Individuals With Blood Group O are at Lower Risk of Infection from COVID-19.

Since the emergence of the Coronavirus or SARS-CoV-2 in December 2019, around 38.5 million COVID-19 cases have been reported from all over the world and death stood to 1.1 million so far. According to WHO, symptoms like fever, dry cough, tiredness are common among COVID-19 patients but the severe symptoms include difficulty breathing or shortness of breath, chest pain or pressure, loss of speech or movement. Risk of contracting COVID-19 may be associated with age, sex, and other comorbidities, such as, cardiovascular disease, hypertension, diabetes and many more.

New Research Suggesting a Significant Connection between Blood Group Type and COVID-19 (SARS-CoV-2).

New Research has been published giving the evidence that there may be an association between the ABO blood group types and susceptibility to COVID-19. In the study, researchers conducted an experiment by comparing data of Danish Health Registries from blood groups of 473,654 individuals tested for COVID-19 and to data from general population of more than 2.2 million people as a control group. In the result, it is surprising to note that they found only fewer people with blood type O are COVID-19 positive and there are more infected patients with blood type A, B and AB.

“Our findings of similar relative protection by blood group O in young individuals, in health care personnel, and in individuals without a registered cardiovascular diagnosis suggest that associations between non-O blood groups and comorbidities do not explain the apparent protection enjoyed by group O individuals”, reported by Zietz and Tatonetti.

Major Highlights of the Study:

Exit mobile version